Who is watching who?

Inquisitive seals, porpoise and cheeky puffins

In Pembrokeshire you are surrounded by nature and wildlife

Wildlife in Pembrokeshire

After the deep sleep of winter, Pembrokeshire bursts into life.

In spring the hedgerows and woodland floors are carpeted with springs flowers which bombard your senses with colour and perfume. Then in early summer, the migrating birds return including the puffins of Skomer Island.

Pembrokeshire has five islands. Skomer and Skokholm allow a lucky few to stay overnight and the chance to roam the island after all other visitors have gone home. Ramsey Island is an RSPB reserve as well as home to Pembrokeshire’s only deer herd.

Strumble Head attracts scores of migratory birds and marine mammals and is home to one of Europe's most important wildlife-watching observatories.

Mark Rowe, for The Independent

Grassholm is a small island that looks like a cake with icing on top but it’s not very tasty. This island is home to Europe’s largest gannetry, that’s 50,000 birds crammed onto this tiny outcrop. It has to be seen, and smelled, to be believed.

Autumn is the pupping season in Pembrokeshire. Hundreds of Atlantic grey seal pups are born on the remote beaches of north Pembrokeshire. Some are visible from the coastal path and beaches but keep your distance! It’s also a great time for migrant birds and is one of the best seasons for birdwatching.