Dinas

(including Dinas Cross, Dinas Head, Pwllgwaelod and Cwm yr Eglwys)

Dinas Cross village is a long linear settlement midway between Fishguard and Newport. The village itself is pretty, with some neat stone built cottages set back from the road. There’s also a garage, a good village shop and a pub called The Ship Aground.

What's in Dinas?

Activities

Walking the Coast Path around Dinas Island is very satisfying and shows off The Pembrokeshire Coast National Park at its best. Dinas Head is 142 metres or 465 feet above sea level so it can be hard going but the views are worth the effort. Doing the route in a clockwise direction gives a great descent back down to Cwm yr Eglwys with some fine views towards Newport.

The low lying neck of land between Pwllgwaelod and Cwm yr Eglwys is all that secures National Trust owned Dinas ‘island’ to the mainland. A wide, accessible footpath suitable for wheelchairs and pushchairs links the two contrasting coves.

Attractions

Cwm yr Eglwys beach is mostly sandy with plenty of rock pools to explore and rocks to clamber over. It’s also east facing which provides sheltered bathing if the prevailing south-westerly wind is blowing or the surf is up.

Food & drink

Behind Pwllgwaelod beach is The Old Sailor’s restaurant serving seafood and real ale. This pub was visited by Dylan Thomas at least once or twice! There are two pubs at Dinas Cross, The Freemasons Arms and The Ship Aground. Dinas Cross also has a small village shop and a petrol station.

Accommodation

There aren’t any hotels in Dinas. You would have to go to Fishguard to find a hotel. There are a few B&Bs, or guesthouses, in and around Dinas. There are also a few campsites, touring caravan sites, and a few sites where you can rent a self-catering static caravan too. There are lots of self-catering cottages, all along this part of the Pembrokeshire Coast.

Getting to Dinas

Dinas Cross and the coastal villages are connected by the coastal bus service 405, the Poppit Rocket with connections to Fishguard and Cardigan.

Did you know...

At the Newport end of the village, a lane takes you to the wonderful little cove at Cwm yr Eglwys. All that remains of the church that gives Cwm yr Eglwys its name is the west wall and belfry. The rest was destroyed by the great storm of 1859.