Trefin to Strumble Head

12½ miles

This route feels very remote indeed, especially as you approach Strumble.

There are some super little beaches en-route including Abercastle, popular with watersports and whose claim to fame is the landing of the first ever single-handed crossing of the Atlantic from west to east by Alfred Johnson on 12th August 1876!

Abermawr and Aberbach are remote beaches backed by pebbles, its a good spot to sit and watch playing seals.

The cliffs from this point onwards begin to rise spectacularly which makes the route quite strenuous. As you reach Pwll Deri make sure to visit the youth hostel to take in the incredible views from the front of the building. Wow!

It’s then downhill, well almost, to Strumble Head and the lighthouse.

Route

  • Leave your car at Strumble and take the Strumble Shuttle to the little cove west of Trefin

  • Head out on the Coast Path as it winds its way around high cliffs to the quaint little cove at Abercastle

  • Just before you reach the beach, take a short inland detour to see Carreg Samson, an exposed burial chamber with an enormous capstone. The coast west of Abercastle is rugged and interesting. Before long you reach the tranquillity of Abermawr beach, an idyllic sun trap, well sheltered from the prevailing winds. In spring, take a detour into the woods to look at the bluebells

  • Just around the corner, at Aberbach, is where a local farmer caught a mermaid, according to local folklore

  • Just past the inaccessible beach at Pwllcrochan, the path climbs a long way up to the ridge above Pwll Deri. The views are spectacular

  • Just before you reach the youth hostel at Pwll Deri, you can walk through the old farm on the right to go to the summit of Garn Fawr. It’s steep, but the views over the Pencaer Peninsula are worth the effort

  • A good downhill section follows. The path to the lighthouse is rocky, with a few uphill gradients, but it’s mostly downhill

  • A little around vale is particularly pleasing, not long before the finish

  • Strumble is a great place for watching passing seabirds, especially in spring and autumn as migrating birds are passing. It’s also a capstone place for spotting porpoises

  • This is where you really appreciate dropping off your car earlier in the day. No waiting for buses!

  • If in doubt, follow the acorn symbols that indicate where the route goes

Download GPX file

Useful info

Refreshments: Pub in Trefin. Cafe at Melin Tregwynt near Aberbach (1-mile detour inland)

Attractions en-route: Carreg Samson cromlech at Abercastle.

Nearest Tourist Information Centre: St Davids at Oriel y Parc – Landscape Gallery.

Tel: 01437 720392

E-mail: orielyparc@pembrokeshirecoast.org.uk

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