Spring walks with breathtaking views

As the days start to lengthen, it’s the perfect time to get out and about.

Take a spring walk with breathtaking views and some spring flowers thrown in too. Here are four of our top picks.

The Gribbin, Solva

  • Why?

Carpets of Bluebells in May, several great pubs and cafe’s in Solva for lunch, incredible views of Solva and the coast.

  • How long?

To the end of the ridge and back will take about an hour but it can be extended to as long as you fancy.

  • How hard?

The paths up and down from the ridge are up hill but quite gentle. The ridge is fairly level. The continuation down to the next bay, however, is very steep.

  • Where?

Park in the harbourside car park. Cross the bridge and turn left. Pick up the footpath that goes up through the woods away from the harbour. Follow this up the hill until you reach a sharp right that will take you along the crest of the ridge (The Gribbin). A track then leads straight back down to the harbour. If you want more, continue along the Pembrokeshire Coast Path until you’ve had enough and return the same way.

Aber Mawr, Mathry

  • Why?

More Bluebells and wild garlic, a great beach and you’ll probably have it all to yourself. The nearest pub is the Farmers Arms in Mathry, which is great for a lunch stop or the cafe at Melin Tregwynt where you can buy some of their iconic welsh woollen products.

  • How long?

To the beach and back will take about an hour and a half depending on how long you spend on the beach. Extending the walk to Abercastle and back will add another hour. 

  • How hard?

There are easy gradients through the woods and along the Coast Path to Abercastle. The path to and from the beach is quite steep. Wellies are advisable if it’s been wet.

  • Where?

From Mathry, take the road towards Abercastle for about a mile. At the cross roads, turn right for another two miles. Park just before the road crosses a bridge and takes a sharp right hand turn. You’ll see a National Trust sign on the gate. Follow the track across a meadow and through the woods (Bluebells in May) until you emerge onto the Coast Path above the beach. Continue left to Abercastle or zig zag down to the beach.

The Golden Road, The Preseli Hills

  • Why?

This was the epicentre of Bronze Age Celtic culture in Wales. Stonehenge Bluestones, Foel Drygarn Hill Fort and the highest viewpoint in Pembrokeshire.

  • How long?

This is a full day walk of 15 miles unless you just want to go to the Bronze Age Hill Fort at Foel Drygarn, which will take about an hour and a half. The Old Post Office and Tafarn Sinc in Rosebush are great for lunch or there’s a pub and cafe in Crymych

  • How hard?

There is steepish rough ground up to Foel Drygarn and it’s quite strenuous walking along the crest of the Preseli’s. It can be a bit boggy towards the western end, wellies recommended!

  • Where?

At the southern end of Crymych on the A478 is a turning to Mynachlog Ddu and Maenclochog. Follow this for about a mile. Just after a left turn in the road is a gateway and a footpath up onto the Preseli’s. Head straight up hill to the Hill Fort. The Golden Road is quite clear heading west along the crest of the Preseli’s. There are panoramic views of the whole of Pembrokeshire from Foel Eryr at the farthest point of the walk.

Tenby to Saundersfoot

  • Why?

More Bluebells!  Plenty of lunchtime options in Saundersfoot

  • How hard?

The Coast Path is uneven and undulating in this section, so walking shoes or boots are recommended.

  • How long?

It’s only 2 miles in each direction but there are enough distractions to fill a whole day.

  • Where?

Park at the North Beach car park in Tenby. Walk up the ramp onto The Croft and turn left. Follow the Pembrokeshire Coast Path in an easterly direction. Take a detour down to Waterwynch beach after about a mile and, if you’re feeling adventurous and the tide is out, scramble down to Monkstone beach. You can walk all the way to Saundersfoot on the beach at low tide but you’ll miss the fantastic Bluebells in the woods on the Coast Path. If you fancy an extension, walk through the old tunnels to Coppet Hall to the new beachside cafe that opens in April/May or carry on to the pub at Wisemans Bridge.

Read more about the Pembrokeshire Coast Path and walking in Pembrokeshire.

WEATHER
 This [the Pembrokeshire Coast Path] is the best walk I’ve done - ever! 
Ian - New Zealand
Abermawr

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Spring walks with breathtaking views  - Solva Harbour, from The Gribbin
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